Nice Apple TV News photos

Some cool Apple TV News images:

A Bitcoin You Can Flip
Apple TV News
Image by jurvetson
My son has become fascinated with bitcoins, and so I had to get him a tangible one for Xmas (thanks Sim1!). The public key is imprinted visibly on the tamper-evident holographic film, and the private key lies underneath.

I too was fascinated by digital cash back in college, and more specifically by the asymmetric mathematical transforms underlying public-key crypto and digital blind signatures.

I remembered a technical paper I wrote, but could not find it. A desktop search revealed an essay that I completely forgot, something that I had recovered from my archives of floppy discs (while I still could).

It is an article I wrote for the school newspaper in 1994. Ironically, Microsoft Word could not open this ancient Microsoft Word file format, but the free text editors could.

What a fun time capsule, below, with some choice naivetés…

I am trying to reconstruct what I was thinking, and wondering if it makes any sense. I think I was arguing that a bulletproof framework for digital cash (and what better testing ground) could be used to secure a digital container for executable code on a rental basis. So the expression of an idea — the specific code, or runtime service — is locked in a secure container. The idea would be to prevent copying instead of punishing after the fact. Micro-currency and micro-code seem like similar exercises in regulating the single use of an issued number.

Now that the Bitcoin experiment is underway, do you know of anyone writing about it as an alternative framework for intellectual property?

IP and Digital Cash
@NORMAL:
Digital Cash and the “Intellectual Property” Oxymoron
By Steve Jurvetson

Many of us will soon be working in the information services or technology industries which are currently tangled in a bramble patch of intellectual property law. As the law struggles to find coherency and an internally-consistent logic for intellectual property (IP) protection, digital encryption technologies may provide a better solution — from the perspective of reducing litigation, exploiting the inherent benefits of an information-based business model, and preserving a free economy of ideas.
Bullet-proof digital cash technology, which is now emerging, can provide a protected “cryptographic container” for intellectual expressions, thereby preserving traditional notions of intellectual property that protect specific instantiations of an idea rather than the idea itself. For example, it seems reasonable that Intuit should be able to protect against the widespread duplication of their Quicken software (the expression of an idea), but they should not be able to patent the underlying idea of single-entry bookkeeping. There are strong economic incentives for digital cash to develop and for those techniques to be adapted for IP protection — to create a protected container or expression of an idea. The rapid march of information technology has strained the evolution of IP law, but rather than patching the law, information technology itself may provide a more coherent solution.

Information Wants To Be Free
Currently, IP law is enigmatic because it is expanding to a domain for which it was not initially intended. In developing the U.S. Constitution, Thomas Jefferson argued that ideas should freely transverse the globe, and that ideas were fundamentally different from material goods. He concluded that “Inventions then cannot, in nature, be a subject of property.” The issues surrounding IP come into sharp focus as we shift to being more of an information-based economy.
The use of e-mail and local TV footage helps disseminate information around the globe and can be a force for democracy — as seen in the TV footage from Chechen, the use of modems in Prague during the Velvet Revolution, and the e-mail and TV from Tianammen Square. Even Gorbachev used a video camera to show what was happening after he was kidnapped. What appears to be an inherent force for democracy runs into problems when it becomes the subject of property.
As higher-level programming languages become more like natural languages, it will become increasingly difficult to distinguish the idea from the code. Language precedes thought, as Jean-Louis Gassée is fond of saying, and our language is the framework for the formulation and expression of our ideas. Restricting software will increasingly be indistinguishable from restricting freedom of speech.
An economy of ideas and human attention depends on the continuous and free exchange of ideas. Because of the associative nature of memory processes, no idea is detached from others. This begs the question, is intellectual property an oxymoron?

Intellectual Property Law is a Patch
John Perry Barlow, former Grateful Dead lyricist and co-founder (with Mitch Kapor) of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, argues that “Intellectual property law cannot be patched, retrofitted or expanded to contain digitized expression... Faith in law will not be an effective strategy for high-tech companies. Law adapts by continuous increments and at a pace second only to geology. Technology advances in lunging jerks. Real-world conditions will continue to change at a blinding pace, and the law will lag further behind, more profoundly confused. This mismatch may prove impossible to overcome.”
From its origins in the Industrial Revolution where the invention of tools took on a new importance, patent and copyright law has protected the physical conveyance of an idea, and not the idea itself. The physical expression is like a container for an idea. But with the emerging information superhighway, the “container” is becoming more ethereal, and it is disappearing altogether. Whether it’s e-mail today, or the future goods of the Information Age, the “expressions” of ideas will be voltage conditions darting around the net, very much like thoughts. The fleeting copy of an image in RAM is not very different that the fleeting image on the retina.
The digitization of all forms of information — from books to songs to images to multimedia — detaches information from the physical plane where IP law has always found definition and precedent. Patents cannot be granted for abstract ideas or algorithms, yet courts have recently upheld the patentability of software as long as it is operating a physical machine or causing a physical result. Copyright law is even more of a patch. The U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 requires that works be fixed in a durable medium, and where an idea and its expression are inseparable, the merger doctrine dictates that the expression cannot be copyrighted. E-mail is not currently copyrightable because it is not a reduction to tangible form. So of course, there is a proposal to amend these copyright provisions. In recent rulings, Lotus won its case that Borland’s Quattro Pro spreadsheet copied elements of Lotus 123’s look and feel, yet Apple lost a similar case versus Microsoft and HP. As Professor Bagley points out in her new text, “It is difficult to reconcile under the total concept and feel test the results in the Apple and Lotus cases.” Given the inconsistencies and economic significance of these issues, it is no surprise that swarms of lawyers are studying to practice in the IP arena.
Back in the early days of Microsoft, Bill Gates wrote an inflammatory “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in which he alleged that “most of you steal your software ... and should be kicked out of any club meeting you show up at.” He presented the economic argument that piracy prevents proper profit streams and “prevents good software from being written.” Now we have Windows.
But seriously, if we continue to believe that the value of information is based on scarcity, as it is with physical objects, we will continue to patch laws that are contrary to the nature of information, which in many cases increases in value with distribution. Small, fast moving companies (like Netscape and Id) protect their ideas by getting to the marketplace quicker than their larger competitors who base their protection on fear and litigation.
The patent office is woefully understaffed and unable to judge the nuances of software. Comptons was initially granted a patent that covered virtually all multimedia technology. When they tried to collect royalties, Microsoft pushed the Patent Office to overturn the patent. In 1992, Software Advertising Corp received a patent for “displaying and integrating commercial advertisements with computer software.” That’s like patenting the concept of a radio commercial. In 1993, a DEC engineer received a patent on just two lines of machine code commonly used in object-oriented programming. CompuServe announced this month that they plan to collect royalties on the widely used GIF file format for images.
The Patent Office has issued well over 12,000 software patents, and a programmer can unknowingly be in violation of any them. Microsoft had to pay 0MM to STAC in February 1994 for violating their patent on data compression. The penalties can be costly, but so can a patent search. Many of the software patents don’t have the words “computer,” “software,” “program,” or “algorithm” in their abstracts. “Software patents turn every decision you make while writing a program into a legal risk,” says Richard Stallman, founder of the League for Programming Freedom. “They make writing a large program like crossing a minefield. Each step has a small chance of stepping on a patent and blowing you up.” The very notion of seventeen years of patent protection in the fast moving software industry seems absurd. MS-DOS did not exist seventeen years ago.
IP law faces the additional wrinkle of jurisdictional issues. Where has an Internet crime taken place? In the country or state in which the computer server resides? Many nations do not have the same intellectual property laws as the U.S. Even within the U.S., the law can be tough to enforce; for example, a group of music publishers sued CompuServe for the digital distribution of copyrighted music. A complication is that CompuServe has no knowledge of the activity since it occurs in the flood of bits transferring between its subscribers
The tension seen in making digital copies revolves around the issue of property. But unlike the theft of material goods, copying does not deprive the owner of their possessions. With digital piracy, it is less a clear ethical issue of theft, and more an abstract notion that you are undermining the business model of an artist or software developer. The distinction between ethics and laws often revolves around their enforceability. Before copy machines, it was hard to make a book, and so it was obvious and visible if someone was copying your work. In the digital age, copying is lightning fast and difficult to detect. Given ethical ambiguity, convenience, and anonymity, it is no wonder we see a cultural shift with regard to digital ethics.

Piracy, Plagiarism and Pilfering
We copy music. We are seldom diligent with our footnotes. We wonder where we’ve seen Strat-man’s PIE and the four slices before. We forward e-mail that may contain text from a copyrighted news publication. The SCBA estimates that 51% of satellite dishes have illegal descramblers. John Perry Barlow estimates that 90% of personal hard drives have some pirated software on them.
Or as last month’s Red Herring editorial points out, “this atmosphere of electronic piracy seems to have in turn spawned a freer attitude than ever toward good old-fashioned plagiarism.” Articles from major publications and WSJ columns appear and circulate widely on the Internet. Computer Pictures magazine replicated a complete article on multimedia databases from New Media magazine, and then publicly apologized.
Music and voice samples are an increasingly common art form, from 2 Live Crew to Negativland to local bands like Voice Farm and Consolidated. Peter Gabriel embraces the shift to repositioned content; “Traditionally, the artist has been the final arbiter of his work. He delivered it and it stood on its own. In the interactive world, artists will also be the suppliers of information and collage material, which people can either accept as is, or manipulate to create their own art. It’s part of the shift from skill-based work to decision-making and editing work.”
But many traditionalists resist the change. Museums are hesitant to embrace digital art because it is impossible to distinguish the original from a copy; according to a curator at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, “The art world is scared to death of this stuff.” The Digital Audio Tape debate also illustrated the paranoia; the music industry first insisted that these DAT recorders had to purposely introduce static into the digital copies they made, and then they settled for an embedded code that limited the number of successive copies that could be made from the a master source.
For a healthier reaction, look at the phenomenally successful business models of Mosaic/Netscape and Id Software, the twisted creator of Doom. Just as McAfee built a business on shareware, Netscape and Id encourage widespread free distribution of their product. But once you want support from Netscape, or the higher levels of the Doom game, then you have to pay. For industries with strong demand-side economies of scale, such as Netscape web browsers or Safe-TCL intelligent agents, the creators have exploited the economies of information distribution. Software products are especially susceptible to increasing returns with scale, as are networking products and most of the information technology industries.
Yet, the Software Publishers Association reports that 1993 worldwide losses to piracy of business application software totaled .45 billion. They also estimated that 89% of software units in Korea were counterfeit. And China has 29 factories, some state-owned, that press 75 million pirated CDs per year, largely for export. GATT will impose the U.S. notions of intellectual property on a world that sees the issue very differently.
Clearly there are strong economic incentives to protect intellectual property, and reasonable arguments can be made for software patents and digital copyright, but the complexities of legal enforcement will be outrun and potentially obviated by the relatively rapid developments of another technology, digital cash and cryptography.

Digital Cash and the IP Lock
Digital cash is in some ways an extreme example of digital “property” -- since it cannot be copied, it is possessed by one entity at a time, and it is static and non-perishable. If the techniques for protecting against pilferage and piracy work in the domain of cash, then they can be used to “protect” other properties by being embedded in them. If I wanted to copy-protect an “original” work of digital art, digital cash techniques be used as the “container” to protect intellectual property in the old style. A bullet-proof digital cash scheme would inevitably be adapted by those who stand to gain from the current system. Such as Bill Gates.
Several companies are developing technologies for electronic commerce. On January 12, several High-Tech Club members attended the Cybermania conference on electronic commerce with the CEOs of Intuit, CyberCash, Enter TV and The Lightspan Partnership. According to Scott Cook, CEO of Intuit, the motivations for digital cash are anonymity and efficient small-transaction Internet commerce. Anonymity preserves our privacy in the age of increasingly intrusive “database marketing” based on credit card purchase patterns and other personal information. Of course, it also has tax-evasion implications. For Internet commerce, cash is more efficient and easier to use than a credit card for small transactions.
“A lot of people will spend nickels on the Internet,” says Dan Lynch of CyberCash. Banks will soon exchange your current cash for cyber-tokens, or a “bag of bits” which you can spend freely on the Internet. A competitor based in the Netherlands called DigiCash has a Web page with numerous articles on electronic money and fully functional demo of their technology. You can get some free cash from them and spend it at some of their allied vendors.
Digital cash is a compelling technology. Wired magazine calls it the “killer application for electronic networks which will change the global economy.” Handling and fraud costs for the paper money system are growing as digital color copiers and ATMs proliferate. Donald Gleason, President of the Smart Card Enterprise unit of Electronic Payment Services argues that “Cash is a nightmare. It costs money handlers in the U.S. alone approximately billion a year to move the stuff... Bills and coinage will increasingly be replaced by some sort of electronic equivalent.” Even a Citibank VP, Sholom Rosen, agrees that “There are going to be winners and losers, but everybody is going to play.”
The digital cash schemes use a blind digital signature and a central repository to protect against piracy and privacy violations. On the privacy issue, the techniques used have been mathematically proven to be protected against privacy violations. The bank cannot trace how the cash is being used or who is using it. Embedded in these schemes are powerful digital cryptography techniques which have recently been spread in the commercial domain (RSA Data Security is a leader in this field and will be speaking to the High Tech Club on January 19).
To protect against piracy requires some extra work. As soon as I have a digital bill on my Mac hard drive, I will want to make a copy, and I can. (Many companies have busted their picks trying to copy protect files from hackers. It will never work.). The difference is that I can only spend the bill once. The copy is worthless. This is possible because every bill has a unique encrypted identifier. In spending the bill, my computer checks with the centralized repository which verifies that my particular bill is still unspent. Once I spend it, it cannot be spent again. As with many electronic transactions today, the safety of the system depends on the integrity of a centralized computer, or what Dan Lynch calls “the big database in the sky.”
One of the most important limitations of the digital cash techniques is that they are tethered to a transaction between at least three parties — a buyer, seller and central repository. So, to use such a scheme to protect intellectual property, would require networked computers and “live” files that have to dial up and check in with the repository to be operational. There are many compelling applications for this, including voter registration, voting tabulation, and the registration of digital artwork originals.
When I asked Dan Lynch about the use of his technology for intellectual property protection, he agreed that the bits that now represent a bill could be used for any number of things, from medical records to photographs. A digital photograph could hide a digital signature in its low-order bits, and it would be imperceptible to the user. But those bits could be used with a registry of proper image owners, and could be used to prove misappropriation or sampling of the image by others.
Technology author Steven Levy has been researching cryptography for Wired magazine, and he responded to my e-mail questions with the reply “You are on the right track in thinking that crypto can preserve IP. I know of several attempts to forward plans to do so.” Digital cash may provide a “crypto-container” to preserve traditional notions of intellectual property.
The transaction tether limits the short-term applicability of these schemes for software copy protection. They won’t work on an isolated computer. This certainly would slow its adoption for mobile computers since the wireless networking infrastructure is so nascent. But with Windows ’95 bundling network connectivity, soon most computers will be network-ready — at least for the Microsoft network. And now that Bill Gates is acquiring Intuit, instead of dollar bills, we will have Bill dollars.
The transaction tether is also a logistical headache with current slow networks, which may hinder its adoption for mass-market applications. For example, if someone forwards a copyrighted e-mail, the recipient may have to have their computer do the repository check before they could see the text of the e-mail. E-mail is slow enough today, but in the near future, these techniques of verifying IP permissions and paying appropriate royalties in digital cash could be background processes on a preemptive multitasking computer (Windows ’95 or Mac OS System 8). The digital cash schemes are consistent with other trends in software distribution and development — specifically software rental and object-oriented “applets” with nested royalty payments. They are also consistent with the document-centric vision of Open Doc and OLE.
The user of the future would start working on their stationary. When it’s clear they are doing some text entry, the word processor would be downloaded and rented for its current usage. Digital pennies would trickle back to the people who wrote or inspired the various portions of the core program. As you use other software applets, such as a spell-checker, it would be downloaded as needed. By renting applets, or potentially finer-grained software objects, the licensing royalties would be automatically tabulated and exchanged, and software piracy would require heroic efforts. Intellectual property would become precisely that — property in a market economy, under lock by its “creator,” and Bill Gates’ 1975 lament over software piracy may now be addressed 20 years later.

--------end of paper-----------

On further reflection, I must have been thinking of executable code (where the runtime requires a cloud connect to authenticate) and not passive media. Verification has been a pain, but perhaps it's seamless in a web-services future. Cloud apps and digital cash depend on it, so why not the code itself.

I don't see it as particularly useful for still images (but it could verify the official owner of any unique bundle of pixels, in the sense that you can "own" a sufficiently large number, but not the essence of a work of art or derivative works). Frankly, I'm not sure about non-interactive content in general, like pure video playback. "Fixing" software IP alone would be a big enough accomplishment.

Strange Bedfellows

A few nice Apple TV News images I found:

Strange Bedfellows
Apple TV News
Image by Viewminder
The events that night in the parking lot changed me forever.

I used to look at things as so much more 'black and white.'

'The police were good' I thought.

And 'our government existed to serve and protect the people.'

There was a certain bliss in living with that ignorance.

One night shattered that and life itself would never be so simple again.

I knew that anyone could go bad.

I'd seen that before.

But the systematic coverup I was witness to...

that whacked my reality big time.

Since then I've made quite a few friends who happen to be cops.

I'd say that in my experience about half of them are an honor to the badge.

The other half...

you'd be shocked that they're nothing but another street gang bunch of thugs...

only they hide behind those badges and blue uniforms.

And they're authorized by the state to carry guns and use deadly force.

I don't think anything's ever offended me so much as seeing that bullshit up close.

It was like some fog was lifted and I saw what went on 'behind the curtain.'

That shit really shook me up.

I'm talking about people who've not only got no problem murdering someone...

but they've got the understanding and the means to get away with it.

There's more than a few people in prison who've been sent there wrongly convicted of crimes these guys have done.

They know how to pull it off.

The only thing that they really fear are the half of the cops who wouldn't tolerate that stuff.

The problem is that in some departments the ratio's pretty skewed.

Like Deadwood.

The whole place is filled with bad apples.

The stories I started to hear were unbelievable.

Witness intimidation.

Planting drugs.

Lying on police reports.

Giving false testimony.

And of course...

firebombing the garbage dumpster in front of my office.

I saw that one with my own eyes.

Or that phone call I got about the Police Commisioner's federal conviction for selling a couple of kilos of the white stuff.

The same guy that owned the bar that installed the illegal poker machines.

The ones that were all gone when the county went to raid his place because Iron Fist supposedly got tipped off and told him he'd better get rid of those things fast.

And I heard Iron Fist was pissed.

Not because his Police Commissioner had an illegal gambling operation going on in his town...

but because he'd kept it a secret from him.

Iron Fist kept secrets.

You didn't keep secrets from him.

There's some dark shadows on the other side of that 'thin blue line' and I'm telling you that I hope you never see them.

They get away with way too much.

They get away with murder.

The corruption is so endemic to the system that I have no faith at all that it can ever be eliminated.

There's a secret code.

If you've ever gotten a ticket and the cop thought you were an asshole all he had to do was to make sure that when he stapled your drivers lisense to the paperwork was that he put the staple through your picture.

The next cop that pulled you over knew right away that some other cop had a problem with you.

Because you had staple holes there on your license.

On your face.

That's the kind of shit that they do.

That's the 'code.'

One thing that they do better than anything though is to stick together.

'Professional courtesy' they call it.

In Chicago givin' another cop a ticket for DUI is an instant career dead end.

The older cops with more experience know how it works.

The young guys get sucked into it in order to prove themselves.

And to survive.

You gotta tow the line if you want backup to help you out in a timely manner when you call for it.

It's almost a rite of passage.

You don't pass the test...

you're gonna get your ass kicked on the streets or worse...

and no one's gonna drive really fast to help you out.

You'll be on your own.

Over the years the cops have developed an 'us or them' mentality.

They become jaded about the way it all works...

they socialize amongst themselves and the women who they call 'holster sniffers.'

They start to hate the legal system...

the judges and the prosecutors...

and then all of the sudden they're one of the 'bad apples.'

You hear about them every once in a while...

either they're busted by the feds or they're turned on by the guys around them because they pissed someone off.

You got no idea how bad it is really.

Not until you start hearin' what's going on 'off the record.'

You'll never sleep as well as you did before you heard the stories.

What makes it all worse is when corrupt politicians start to use the police as a 'personal army.'

That only makes everything dirtier.

The cops know that they're gonna get away with so much more when the guys above them are corrupt too.

That's the way it went in Deadwood.

Iron Fist used the police like they were his own little militia.

If he had a problem with you then you had yourself a problem with the cops.

And keepin' Iron Fist happy took precedence over 'law and order' any day of the week in Deadwood.

You got old Iron Fist pissed off at you that'd be a real quick end to your career in 'law enforcement.'

While Iron Fist ran the place the town was known as a really desirable place to live.

You didn't put a 'for sale' sign in front of your house if you wanted to sell it when he was in charge.

The old man would never tolerate that.

He had a list of people who wanted to live there and him and his cronies would figure out who they were gonna let buy your house.

They didn't want any 'undesirables' moving in.

And by 'undesirables' I mean black people.

Iron Fist thought that 'for sale' signs on people's homes made him look bad.

Dude should have been a cult leader the way he operated.

If you went around 'the system'...

and some people did because they felt that Iron Fist's little policy was cutting their profits on the sale of their homes...

Iron Fist would send the cops out late at night and snatch that 'for sale' sign right out of your front yard.

The guys I talked to said 'Secret Squirrel' was always up for the job.

He was the guy that drove around with the trunk full of machine guns.

The Village was sued in federal court for the practice by real estate agents and the Village lost on First Ammendment grounds...

but they still kept doing it.

Iron Fist reduced the police to commonon thievery.

For a lot of them I think that was the line that they'd first crossed into the corruption that soiled the place.

Kind of like a little 'initiation' into the way things were done in Deadwood.

They wanted to make damn sure no 'undesirables' were ever hired on to the police department too.

They asked applicants to provide a picture of themselves with their applications.

You better not have a dark complection if you wanted to get a job there.

The thing that really made everything so corrupt was that the Chief would always end up with a big old bag of dirt on Iron Fist...

just as much as Iron Fist'd end up with a big old bag of dirt on the Chief.

The relationships never seemed to last too long because Iron Fist knew the game better than any of the clowns he'd make Chief.

He'd take 'em down before they really became a threat.

When Skeevy left there to run another department it wasn't too long before the feds were all over his ass.

It was Skeevy who'd installed the guy that'd become the next Chief...

'Chief Hotdog.'

The one I sent the 'nutcracker' letter to.

Where I told him 'I was gonna squeeze his balls until they popped.'

The letter I had to read in front of the jury with all the good stuff blacked out.

Man I really thought I was gonna be charged with some serious felonies for that action.

Even my lawyer said he was worried about it.

'You don't go around writing that kind of stuff down' he said 'say whatever you want but you don't write letters like that and send them to the Chief of Police signed with your name.'

Fortunately the statute of limitations has run out on that one and I ain't got no problems that way.

I really tortured poor Chief Hotdog...

got inside his head and fucked with him big time.

The way I saw it he deserved it.

I mean... he was the boss... and he coudda done something to make things right for me and my family.

He was given the chance to do the right thing.

They all were.

But when he came out lying to the media about what happened that night and defended the actions of his street thug cops I knew I was goin' after his ass any way I could.

Right after the case against my wife was thrown out Chief Hotdog resigned.

Of course The Kid said it had nothin' to do with the bungling of that case...

and insiders said it was because he didn't do really well at fundraising for The Kid politically...

but I didn't care.

He was just one more corrupt motherfucker that I had in my crosshairs that went down in flames.

Whatever it was it ended his career.

The department went without a Chief for a few months and everyone speculated on who was gonna be named Chief Hotdog's successor.

I was shakin' the place up with allegations about the use of the contaminated well but that was all kinda behind the scenes...

the media or the feds hadn't picked up on it just yet.

When The Kid appointed the new Chief, me and The Mole both let out a collective gasp at the same time.

He appointed a woman who used to run the water department.

Terry Stewbauer.

I couldn't believe it.

It was such an obvious payoff and anyone in the know could see that right away.

It was blatant.

The Kid wasn't just 'ball-less' he seemed to be brainless too.

That was the first time I knew I really had those assholes and I knew I had them good.

They knew the feds were comin' sooner or later because I wasn't letting up and appointing Stewbauer as the new Chief of Police was a sort of premptory strike.

They wanted to keep her quiet and they wanted to keep her loyal...

put her on the 'short leash.'

I think she was scared shitless about what was comin' down the line and thinkin' about makin' a deal herself with the federales.

The Kid appointing her as the new Chief was probably a confidence builder for the woman.

She was working part time as a detective for the department before she was appointed Chief and I'd heard she wasn't a bad cop.

But she knew the truth about the use of the contaminated well and I knew that in appointing her that The Kid was hoping she'd never tell that truth to anyone.

Especially the feds.

I heard that her husband was a convicted drug dealer who was sitting in prison at the time she was appointed as the new Chief too.

She couldn't have been a very good detective if she didn't know that the old man was dealin' drugs out of her house.

Or she was a very corrupt detective.

Take your pick.

She was working as the Chief of Police in Deadwood when she was indicted on something like twenty three felony counts by the US Attorney.

She had to surrender her gun and her firearm owners identification card to the feds right after that.

Deadwood gave her a paid 'leave of absence' so now she gets paid for doing nothing.

Except takin' a fall for Iron Fist and his crew and keeping some serious secrets.

Of course they're paying her legal bills too.

I can't believe they get away with that shit but they do.

If I was a reporter I'd tear 'em a new one over that story.

I guess that made her the second Chief of Police that I'd end up takin' down in a row over this whole thing.

The Mole once pointed out that 'fucking with you doesn't seem to be a really good career move.'

We shared a good laugh over that one.

I was makin' enemies there almost as fast as I'm known to make friends.

And I was using the enemies of my enemy pretty effectively too.

That's why I'd reached out to Congressman Bobby Rush.

Krista'd made the introduction.

I'd read that when Rush was first elected to Congress that Iron Fist was pretty pissed off that now a black man would be representing Deadwood in Congress.

He was quoted in the newspapers saying that he wanted to secceed from the congressional district because 'there was no way that that man could represent the white ethnics of Deadwood.'

That comment really pissed off Congressman Rush and I don't think he ever forgot it.

Or forgave it.

I remember thinking 'this guy will really be a help in nailing Iron Fist to the cross' and I was right.

Congressman Rush and I are not the kind of guys who you'd ever accuse of seeing 'eye to eye' politically but we had a common enemy in Iron Fist and that's all it takes in Illinois politics... or politics in general to gain a strong ally.

I remember the Congressman pulling me out of a big meeting saying that he wanted me to get in front of the cameras with him and talk to the press.

Right after he'd given the best political speech I've ever had the great pleasure to witness.

I'm telling you I swear he channeled the spirit of a baptist preacher from the deep south of the seventies on that one.

I think the Congressman wanted Iron Fist to see him with his arm around me there smiling.

Kinda like twisting the knife if you know what I mean.

I also remember the Fox News reporter with that tight sweater and the most amazing pair of tits I'd ever seen...

I thought it was pretty funny that I'm standing next to a Congressman with about a half a dozen tv cameras in my face blowin' the lid on Iron Fist and his dirty and despicable deeds and I can't take my eyes off of this woman's rack.

I'm usually not like that...

but damn... the combination of that sweater and her upper body were a work of freakin' art...

a thing of incredible beauty.

That moment was the closest I'd ever come to feeling a woman up on live tv.

I'm glad the Congressman did most of the talking.

When I watched myself on tv that night I looked like a really honest guy lookin' right into the camera like that.

Only me and God knew where I was really looking though.

And I blame the whole thing on God anyway.

That was not the work of some plastic surgeon...

and if it was, then it was God that gave him that talent...

so I still blame God and I think he'd be honored that I do.

I felt like dirt for thinkin' that way there though.

Iron Fist and his shenanigans killed people.

Innocent people that had no idea that they were drinking that cancer water.

There were so many people with cancer there at that meeting.

I shook their hands and I hugged them.

I looked into their eyes and I listened to their stories.

And it all got me even more pissed off at what those assholes did.

Yeah... there was a certain selfish satisfaction in the imminent crucifiction of the people who'd hurt my family...

but more and more I was beginning to find myself taking up the crusade to bring these guys to justice not just for what they'd done to me and my family...

but for what they'd done to the people that trusted them.

They had to pay for what they'd done and it seemed like I was the only one with the balls and the motivation and the understanding of the situation to keep driving them towards justice.

And now I had some powerful people on my side.

Rush had called Eric Holder, the US Attorney General from the meeting and told him what was going on.

Shit was getting stirred up alright.

I was excited.

I'd seen enough in that parking lot and in the days after to know that they were soul-less and corrupt and I wanted to show everyone that.

I wanted revenge ever since that night.

There was a battle going on inside of my soul by this time.

And I found myself slowly letting the whole concept of revenge go.

More than anything...

I really wanted justice.

And I wanted it for the frail thirty eight year old woman I'd just hugged who had cancer all over her body and was sick right there from all of the chemo...

I wanted justice for her.

They had no right to do that to another human being.

Iron Fist and his whole crew hadda go down for this.

From the series 'There's Something in the Water' here on Flickr... www.flickr.com/photos/light_seeker/sets/72157627041317913...

BBC & Pathe News Archives
Apple TV News
Image by brizzle born and bred
BBC Points West Archive & Pathe News Archives

BBC Points West Archive on Demand gives you access to clips from the BBC's regional news archive in Bristol. During November and December 2005, selected video and film clips about Somerset, Gloucestershire, Wiltshire were added to these pages.

Archive Film Clips & Sound Files - photographs include -

1953 - Bristol's Coronation Queen

Natalie Gonella was entered for Miss Bristol 1953 by her boss who had seen an advert for the contest in the Western Daily Press.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/jubilee/memories/missbristo...

Clarks: 60s/70s/80s

The boom-and-bust days of the 1980s were tough for Clarks Shoes as customers opted for cheap foreign imports over Somerset-made footwear. Points West has followed the company's 'uppers' and 'downers' over the years, as this selection of films reveal.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Bath Rugby: 1986

For the third year in a row, Bath won the John Player Cup at Twickenham. They faced the mighty Wasps in a lively match, that included some ugly moments when the teams came to blows. Captain John Palmer told Points West they knew victory was certain.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Bishop Carey: 1990

In a surprise announcement, Dr George Carey, the Bishop of Bath and Wells, was named the next Anglican Primate following the retirement of Dr Robert Runcie - news which was greeted with mixed reaction in the summer of July 1990.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Bath traffic: 1965

Yes, sexism was alive and well in the 1960s but it probably wasn't intentional. In this film from the Points West archives, a reporter attempts to discover why the city's parking planners were targeting businessmen in Bath.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Acker Bilk: 1977

The Somerset man who brought Stranger on the Shore to millions of music lovers around the world talks to Points West's reporter Graham Purches ahead of a live show recorded for TV outside The Duke in Bristol back in 1977.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Wassailing: 1982

Points West travels to the orchards of Somerset to witness the Taunton Cider Company's annual apple tree wassail. Held aloft by three burly blokes, the cider queen performs a ritual that will guarantee a good crop the following year.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Hinkley A: 1965

The nuclear power industry has come a long way since the 50s and 60s when our understanding of the issues was less developed than today. Tom Salmon reports from Hinkley A as the station generates electricity for the first time.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

West's Wintry Weather

Whatever the conditions, Points West has always been ready to capture the region’s more extreme spells of weather. Remember the winter of 1981/2 or the snows of the 1960s? Perhaps this selection of films will bring back some chilling memories.

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Bath Gliding Club: 1965

Points West cameras reached for the skies in 1965 with a visit to an RAF airfield in Wiltshire to meet up with members of the Bath Gliding Club - where, for women members at least, it seemed that whatever the men could do they could do better!

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Bridgwater's bigger, brighter spectacle

At this time of year, it would be criminal to take a look through the Points West film archive without digging out some footage showing Bridgwater's famous carnival - particularly since it is one of the best illuminated processions in the UK!

www.bbc.co.uk/somerset/tv_archive/

Hartcliffe Factory: 1970s

In 1974, WD and HO Wills opened Europe’s largest cigarette manufacturing plant on land at Hartcliffe near Bristol. The factory lasted all of 16 years and closed in 1990 as the tobacco industry felt the squeeze. Points West saw the factory open.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/articles/2005/12/23/pwaod_c...

Forest of Dean: 1965

The Forest of Dean was shaped, in part, by mining. Many of the pits closed in the 1960s, such as the Northern United Colliery and BBC Points West spent time with the miners to gauge their reaction.

www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire/content/articles/2005/12/22...

Railway Works: 1960s

This offering – although not strictly a BBC Points West film – is irresistible for all those who have a passion for steam engines. Filmed at the Swindon loco works in 1963, it shows the launch of the last BR steam locomotive to be made in the UK.

www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2005/12/23/pwaod...

Downend crash remembered 50 years on: BBC Points West

Fifty years ago - at just before midday on Wednesday, 6 November 1957 - a patch of woodland alongside Overndale Road, Downend, was torn apart in a terrible air disaster.

Life inside the Fry's factory: 1930s

A fascinating film showing life inside the Fry's chocolate factory at Keynsham in its 1930s hey day is being shown publicly in full here on bbc.co.uk/bristol for the first time.

news.bbc.co.uk/local/bristol/hi/people_and_places/newsid_...

Behind The Front Line: 1980s

In 1981, St Paul's in Bristol hit the headlines when a police raid triggered the first riots, which subsequently spread across the country.

At the heart of the action was Grosvenor Road, otherwise known as "The Front Line".

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/sop/grosvenor_road/frontlin...

Southmead Hospital photographic archives

Southmead Hospital photographic archive is opened. A fascinating collection of pictures charting the history of Southmead Hospital in Bristol.

news.bbc.co.uk/local/bristol/hi/people_and_places/newsid_...

Let Me Tell You: Swindon 1967

Watch a BBC West programme from 1967, whose presenters went out onto the streets to ask locals what they thought of life in Swindon, and look at the pressing issues of the town.

www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2008/06/05/let_m...

Do you think the Brissle accent is gert lush? Or does it make you sound like a Wurzel?

The dialect words 'casn't' and 'bist', as in, how bist?, (how are you?), appear to be on their way out while 'ideal' and 'where's that to?' are resilient.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/sop/brizzle/story.shtml

How does Bristol look to somebody without sight?

Malcolm Chappell tells A Sense of Place how he views the city.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/sop/malcolm_bridge/malcolms...

People and places between two piers

A Sense of Place" takes a journey along the coast of North Somerset from Clevedon Pier to the promenade at Weston.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/sop/severn/severn.shtml

Red or blue? City or Rovers?

Nothing divides a city like it. Nothing divides families like it. And there's nothing better for turning friends against each other.

www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/sop/football/football.shtml

In pictures: Rocking The Granary

The Granary rock club ran from 1968 until 1988 in a former grain warehouse in Bristol.

news.bbc.co.uk/local/bristol/hi/people_and_places/history...

Floods of 1968

Archive photographs on file in what was the old News Stills Library

www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/photoblog/2009/11/stock_shots_from_th...

The Links Below British Pathe Archive News Clips -

1949 130-Ton Colossus Takes The Air

Bristol Brabazon on airfield at Filton.

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=27110

1926 - 9000 Bristol School Children

Demonstration of modern methods of physical education

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=25361

1967 - AIR CRASH AT BRISTOL AIRPORT

Various shots of the Aer Lingus Viscount plane which crash landed in fog at Lulsgate Airport, Bristol.

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=72520

1957 - THE BRITANNIA AIR CRASH - 15 DEAD

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=34878

1965 Bristol Zoo

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=70440

1968 baby gorilla called Caroline, a new arrival at Bristol Zoo

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=45482

1949 - Britain's first aluminium prefabricated school is on show in Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=26535

1956 - Petition against closure of Kennet-Avon canal

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=40079

1956 - B.O.A.C. takes delivery of the first of their new fleet of 15 Bristol turboprop airliners

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=39969

1947 - ABC Minors in Bristol Cup Final

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=57871

1967 - Very brief slice of life in Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=84872

1914 - Bristol Cadets reviewed by Lord Mayor of Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=76108

1964 - The Bristol Channel and Docks, views of Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=81932

1965 - Bristol harbour in colour

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=70533

1962 - Jet inventor Sir Frank Whittle lays foundation stone for new Bristol-Siddeley building

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=42118

1952 - Minister of Health Iain McLeod opens new Bristol Health Centre

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=62685

1967 - BRISTOL HOLDS ANTI LITTER WEEK

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=83464

1948 - Students run Carnival rag through City streets in Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=27140

1951 - Bristol civil defence and military jointly stage and fight A-bomb attack

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=33160

1921 - Students from Bristol University parade through the streets

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=18369

1949 - experiments being carried out on different types of cigarettes in Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=46750

1966 - A.B.C. Cinema in Frogmore Street Bristol Opens

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=44427

A demonstration against the nationalisation of transport industry is held in Bristol

www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=57764

AppleTV Adds a New Redesigned Flickr App
Apple TV News
Image by Vintuitive
Apple has added a bunch of new apps to the AppleTV today such as ABC News, PBS Kids, Willow TV, AOL On, and a redesigned Flickr app. However, if you are located outside of America you will get only the Flickr update.

The new redesigned Flickr app now includes an Explore view, a section called “Your Flickr”, an improved search, and a curated iPhoneography section.

There is no need to update the AppleTV software. After clicking on the Flickr app on Apple TV you'll be given a 6 digit code that you'll have to enter at flickr.com/apppletv on your computer or iOS device.

Bryant Park, late Apr 2009 – 21

A few nice Apple TV News images I found:

Bryant Park, late Apr 2009 - 21
Apple TV News
Image by Ed Yourdon
The young woman here is beautiful, and I love the reflection of the keyboard in her sunglasses ... but I gotta tell ya: the combination of grass and green-glow on the back of her laptop is out of this world. I have to admit that I used some color saturation to pump up the colors a little ... but not much. This photograph made itself: I just happened to be in the right place, at the right time, to point my camera in the right direction and push the shutter-button...

Note: this photo was published in a May 26, 2009 blog titled "Memorial Day Weekend Link Love." And it was published in a June 3, 2009 blog titled "THE NEW COMMENTARIAT." It was also published in a Jun 25, 2009 Romanian blog titled "Vom avea wireless în Craiova?" It was also published as an illustration in a Sep 2009 Mahalo blog titled "Bryant Young," at www-dot-mahalo-dot-com-slash-bryant-dash-young, even though it has nothing to do with the football player of that name....

Moving into 2010, the photo was published in a Jan 15, 2010 blog titled "Die Fußball WM live auf dem Laptop: Aber wie?" And it was published in a Mar 5, 2010 blog titled "Two Simple Ways to Make Every Action Count." It was also published in a Jun 27, 2010 blog titled " „Isch hab Rücken!“ – mit dem Laptop auf dem Boden sitzen." And it was published in a Jul 6, 2010 blog titled "7 Ways To Bump Your Frequent Flyer Earning Up A Notch." It was also published in a Jul 7, 2010 blog titled "Know Your Laptop's Temperature Limits to Avoid Summer Meltdowns." And I just discovered that the photo was published in a May 26, 2010 blog titled "Memorial Day Weekend Link Love." It was also published in a Jul 9, 2010 blog titled "Links: Let Your Mind Wander, Credit Cards, Paranoid Collaborators, and More." And it was published in a Jul 11, 2010 blog titled "Modern Muses," as well as a Jul 20, 2010 blog titled "What Does It Mean to be a Nomad?" It was also published in a Jul 24, 2010 blog titled "夏の外出でパソコンを持ち歩く時に気をつけるべき9つのポイント,"which I think means "Summer Laptop" And it was published in a Sep 2, 2010 blog titled "5 Essential Web Marketing Tools for Small Green Businesses." It was also published in a Sep 10, 2010 blog titled "No mundo online." And, for no obvious reason at all, it was published in a Sep 30, 2010 blog titled "credit card programs, which is better, cash back (i.e. 4% on American Express) or frequent flyer miles bonus?" It was also published -- again, for no obvious reason -- in an Oct 13, 2010 "Credit Card Trends Daily" blog titled "Discover How To Maximize the Potentials of a Low APR Credit Card." And it was published in a Nov 1, 2010 blog titled "The Secret to Doing Your Best Work Effortlessly , as well as a Nov 2, 2010 blog titled "Thing 11: My Flickr Experience." It was also published in an undated (mid-Nov 2010) blog titled "Make Travel a Part of Your Life Again with Airline Miles Credit Cards." It was also published in an undated (late Nov 2010) blog titled " Make Travel Affordable and Easy with Airline Miles Credit Cards." And it was published in an undated (Dec 2010) blog titled "Are You One of the Millions That Could Benefit from an Airline Miles Credit Card?" It was also published in an Dec 19, 2010 blog titled "Airline Miles Credit Card Comparison," and it was published in a Dec 23, 2010 blog titled "Idée cadeau : Vivre léger."

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a Feb 20, 2011 Polish blog titled "Prowadzisz fan page? Sprawdź, czy Twoja aktywność nie trafia w próżnię," as well as a Feb 20, 2011 Girl Log blog , with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. It was also published in a Feb 22, 2011 blog titled "WNBA's L.A. Chapter Presents Bookwoman Day On Saturday." And it was published in a Mar 11, 2011 blog titled "Top 10 Reasons to Work Online." It was also published in an Apr 1, 2011 Work At Home Careers blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. And it was published in an Apr 4, 2011 blog titled "당신의 길을 가라." It was also published in an Apr 8, 2011 blog titled "Internet gratuit, c’est possible!", as well as an Apr 11, 2011 blog titled "Enola the Welder, Woman Welder at Heil Company." And it was published as an illustration in an undated (late Apr 2011) Book Drum website. It was also published in an Apr 25, 2011 blog titled "What Kind Of Blogs Do Women Love?" as well as an Apr 25, 2011 blog titled "Article Marketing Domination Review: The Definative Resource For Article Marketing." And it was published in an Apr 26, 2011 blog titled "„The innere Schweinehund does not live here anymore“." And it was published in an Apr 30, 2011 blog titled "MacBook Air battery better than advertised." It was also published in a May 4, 2011 blog titled "How To Keep Your Laptop Cool." And it was published in an undated (late May 2011) blog titled "8 Reasons I Love My Laptop." It was also published in a May 25, 2011 blog titled "i2011年夏モデルが出そろったので検討してみた."

Moving into June, the photo was published in a Jun 3, 2011 blog titled "3 Things I’ve Learned about Blogging – And Life," as well as a Jun 9, 2011 Marketing-En-Web blog, with the same caption as what I had written on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Jun 13, 2011 blog titled "トップへデスクトップパソコンパソコン関連." It was also published in a Jun 17, 2011 blog titled "ノートパソコン使用時の姿勢の直し方を示した動画," as well as a Jun 17, 2011 blog titled "8 Personal Finance Basics to Tackle NOW." It was also published in a June 10, 2011 blog titled "The Real Social Life of Wireless Public Spaces." And it was published in a Jun 27, 2011 blog titled "„Isch hab Rücken!“ – mit dem Laptop auf der Wiese sitzen, as well as a Jun 28, 2011 blog titled "Taking your blog mobile: are you geared up?," as well as a Jun 28, 2011 Page i blog titled "Mac Book Airの販売は近い? 米Best Buyで販売一時停止." It was also published in a Jul 11, 2011 e-Portalik blog titled "Play: Więcej Internetu dla abonentów, nowe modemy." And it was published in a Jul 29, 2011 blog titled "Apple now has more cash than the US Government."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a Jan 15, 2012 blog titled "Nice Credit Card With Cash Back photos." It was also published in a Jan 23, 2012 blog titled "アメリカの若者たちの間で“愛の証”としてパスワードを共有することが流行." And it was published in a Jan 31, 2012 blog titled "Where Do I Start? How to Stop Dreaming and Get Moving" It was also published in a Feb 3,2012 blog titled "WM3600Rがあまりにも優れているので前機種WM3500Rとライバル機種URoad-8000を比較してみた," as well as a Feb 3, 2012 Nice Online Learning photos blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Feb 10, 2012 Gizmodo blog titled "An Apple Patent for Displays That Optimize Themselves According to Your Surroundings." It was also published in a Mar 9, 2012 blog titled "How I Use Technology When I'm Traveling." And it was published in a Mar 15, 2012 blog titled "5 Reasons Not to Delete Your Emails." It was also published in a Mar 28, 2012 blog titled "Benefits of a Merchant Account for your Online Store." It was also published in an Apr 15, 2012 blog titled "5 FAQ about sunglasses," as well as an Apr 16, 2012 blog titled "E voi fate vedere il vostro profilo Facebook ai vostri figli?", as well as an Apr 19, 2012 blog titled "Googling Your Symptoms Will Make You Sick," and an Apr 20, 2012 blog titled "tSurvival Survey: What is your weekend prepping project?" It was also published in an Apr 30, 2012 blog titled "144 Places to Educate Yourself Online for Free," and it was published in a May 2, 2012 blog titled "Universities introduce distance-learning courses." It was also published in a May 24, 2012 blog titled "TWITTERFITTER – DEN NYE FEMINISMEN," as well as a May 31, 2012 blog titled "Escola virtual d’estiu Espiral." And it was published in an undated (early Jun 2012) Lurvely blog titled, with great imaginative creativity, "Photo by Ed Yourdon," as well as a Jun 1, 2012 Gigazine blog titled "節電でも最も利用を控えたくない家電は年齢・性別問わず「パソコン」." And it was published in what appears to be the home page of an undated (early Jun 2012) blog titled Social Blog Marketing. It was also published in an undated (early Jun 2012) blog titled "How to make money online by outsourcing data entry projects," as well as an undated (early Jun 2012) Colorado Springs Information Center blog titled "A Fresh Start To Finding A Job." It was also published in a Jun 21, 2012 blog titled "6 Little-Known Facts that Could Affect Your Air Miles." And it was published in a Jun 28, 2012 blog titled "Offenes WLAN in Zürich: Die Stadt will sparen und ein Netz wie in Bern."

Moving into the second half of 2012, the photo was published in a Jul 1, 2012 blog titled "Tlc: gli operatori europei vogliono adeguati ritorni sugli investment." And it was published in a Jul 3, 2012 blog titled "How To Run Your Blog While You Are on the Move." It was also published in a Jul 8, 2012 PolySquare blog titled (I think) "엮인글 주소가 복사되었습니다." And it was published in a Jul 19, 2012 blog titled "Jugendliche sind immer länger online," as well as a Jul 19, 2012 blog titled "Where to find free wifi at the London Olympics." It was also published in a Jul 28, 2012 blog titled "What You're Actually Looking At When You Look At Facebook." And it was published in a Sep 2, 2012 blog titled "What Every Business Owner Should Understand About Article Marketing!" It was also published in a Sep 8, 2012 blog titled "Ask The Trainers: What Is Your Best Low (or no) Cost Marketing Tactic?" And it was published in a Sep 13, 2012 blog titled "Online-Shops: der Vergleich." I've discovered that it was also published in a Sep 5, 2012 blog titled "Online Reputation Management for Sex Bloggers." It was also published in an Oct 3, 2012 blog titled "Wat zoekt Generatie Y?", as well as an Oct 21, 2012 blog titled "Le paradox Facebook." And it was published in an Oct 15, 2012 blog titled "http://www.bloggingbistro.com/two-new-social-networks-to-try-recmnd-me-and-pocular/." It was also published in a Nov 13, 2012 blog titled "Varied Article Marketing Techniques to Try With Your Business." And it was published in an undated (mid-Nov 2012) blog titled "Legitimate Work From Home Jobs." It was also published in a Dec 5, 2012 blog titled "Ask LH: Can I Leave My Gadgets In A Hot Car?" And it was published in a Dec 29, 2012 blog titled "Work from home in your own online business."

Moving into 2013, the photo was published in a Jan 4, 2013 blog titled "Learn How To Make Your Article Submission A Big Success With These Tips." And it was published in a Jan 15, 2013 blog titled "10 erros comuns nos blogs." It was also published in a Jan 22, 2013 blog titled "Guest Post: New Year, New Career," as well as a Jan 25, 2013 blog titled "You Need Great Content If You Want Your Article To Succeed." And it was published in a Feb 8, 2013 Italian blog titled "Esserci o non esserci… sul web – 1^ Parte." It was also published in a Feb 10, 2013 blog titled "Making Long Distance Relationships Work." And it was published in a Feb 11, 2013 blog titled "Hack Like a Pro: How to Remotely Install a Keylogger onto Your Girlfriend's Computer," as well as a Feb 16, 2013 blog titled "Lent Reflection: Focusing on Work and Rest." It was also published in a Feb 19, 2013 Finnish blog titled "Näin synkronoit Lumiasi Mac-tietokoneen kanssa." And it was published in a Feb 27, 2013 blog titled "Will MOOCs be the End of the College Campus?" It was also published in a Mar 1, 2013 blog titled "病気の発症にも影響!?情報化社会を生きるあなたが病気から自分を守るスキル“健康リテラシー”." And it was published in a Feb 27 , 2013 blog titled "Will MOOCs be the End of the College Campus?" It was also published in a Mar 22, 2013 blog titled "72% Of Professors Who Teach Online Courses Don’t Think Their Students Deserve Credit," as well as a Mar 23, 2013 blog titled "Když ovládnete svoji mysl, ovládnete svůj život." And it was published in a Mar 27, 2013 Dutch blog titled "MOOC's hype of heilige graal?" It was also published in an Apr 2, 2013 blog titled "30 sources to keep you updated on business and marketing," and an Apr 3, 2013 blog titled "Blackberry Mobile Phones Technical Gadgets Providing Overwhelming Functionalities," as well as an Apr 4, 2013 blog titled "Job Searching Tips When Moving to Tasmania." And it was published in an Apr 21, 2013 blog titled "Zarabiaj na poradnikach internetowych!," as well as an Apr 25, 2013 blog titled "WO dynamisch masculien," and an Apr 26, 2013 blog titled "The Importance of Your Online Reputation."

Moving on, the photo was published in a May 1, 2013 blog titled "Here's More Proof It's Time To Switch To An Online Bank." And it was published in a May 2, 2013 blog titled "Veränderung durch Digitalisierung der Entwicklung." It was also published in an undated (mid-May 2013) blog titled "10 Reasons To Start a Travel Blog." And it was published in a May 15, 2013 blog titled "Does your PR Agency Know How to Connect?", as well as a May 16, 2013 blog titled "The Best Financial Software." It was also published in a May 22, 2013 blog titled "Women Manage Credit Better Than Men, Study Says." And it was published in a Jun 2, 2013 blog titled "Twitter rende più facile modificare il nostro profilo," as well as a Jun 5, 2013 blog titled "Medium is a platform for writers, not readers" and a Jun 5, 2013 blog titled "私なりのGoogle検索順位をアップさせる方法." It was also published in a Jun 11, 2013 blog titled "Leren van online studeren," as well as a Jun 12, 2013 blog titled "Higher Ed, Listen To Your Facebook Fans." And it was published in a Jun 27, 2013 blog titled "子どもができたらプログラミングを習わせたい ," as well as a Jun 27,2013 blog titled "After 10 years, Google purges Blogger of all "adult" sites." It was also published in a Jul 8, 2013 blog titled "Aantal flexwerkers gestegen," and a Jul 12, 2013 blog titled "Online Jobs for Your Teen This Summer," as well as a Jul 22, 2013 blog titled What I like best about being a Spotter….," and a Jul 20, 2013 Slate France blog titled "LES RELATIONS À DISTANCE FAVORISENT L'INTIMITÉ DANS LE COUPLE" and a Jul 22, 2013 blog titled "Как организовать поиск работы в Краснодаре." And it was published in a Jul 26, 2013 Selmicro blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. It was also published in an undated (mid-August 2013) blog titled "Get Your Name Out There With These Wonderful Tips." And it was published in a Sep 10, 2013 blog titled "Students Battle School Districts Over First Amendment Rights On Social Media."

Moving into 2014, the photo was the first of my Flickr archives to be published -- in a Jan 1, 2014 blog titled "The Evils of Social Media." It was also published in a Jan 10, 2014 blog titled "スモールビジネスを選択する判断基準 10のチェック項目." And it was published in a Mar 13, 2014 blog titled "Outil B2B : le troc entre professionals." And it was published in a May 1, 2014 blog titled "What gives a website game-changer status? Or, how to have a website that sells." It was also published in an Aug 12, 2014 blog titled "More sunlight exposure reduces risk of shortsightedness."

Moving into 2015, the photo was published in an undated (mid-January 2015) German blog titled Jugendliche und Datenschutz in Sozialen Netzwerken

That Was the Year That Was - 1967
Apple TV News
Image by brizzle born and bred
1967 the continued presence of American troops increased further and a total of 475,000 were serving in Vietnam and the peace rallies were multiplying as the number of protesters against the war increased.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpWEv9Q0XQ4

The Boxer Muhammad Ali was stripped of his boxing world championship for refusing to be inducted into the US Army.

In the middle east Israel also went to war with Syria, Egypt and Jordan in the six day war and when it was over Israel controlled and occupied a lot more territory than before the war.

Once again in the summer cities throughout America exploded in rioting and looting the worst being in Detroit on July 23rd where 7000 national Guard were bought in to restore law and order on the streets.

In England a new type of model became a fashion sensation by the name of Twiggy and mini skirts continued to get shorter and even more popular with a short lived fashion being paper clothing.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SB5eIfHXkWQ

Also during this year new Discotheques and singles bars appeared across cities around the world and the Beatles continued to reign supreme with the release of "Sgt. Peppers Lonely Heart Club Band" album, and this year was also coined the summer of love when young teenagers got friendly and smoked pot and grooved to the music of "The Grateful Dead. Jefferson Airplane and The Byrds".

UK beat combos as The Searchers, Gerry and The Pacemakers, The Who and The Kinks enjoyed more commercial success.

The movie industry moved with the times and produced movies that would appeal to this younger audience including "The Graduate" Bonnie and Clyde" and "Cool Hand Luke" .

TV shows included "The Fugitive" and "The Monkees" and color television sets become popular as the price comes down and more programmes are made in color.

"Summer of Love"

Memories of the Summer of Love five decades after the event all too often seem to concentrate on the clichéd imagery parodied by Mike Myers in Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery. But such artists as The Seekers are as much a part of the summer of 1967 as The Beatles, and their vast record sales cannot be entirely explained away by their appeal to a middle-aged public. The fact that "Georgy Girl" was the theme song to a popular film certainly boosted its success. It also garnered the only known Oscar nomination for a member of the Carry On team; the lyrics were by Jim Dale.

But this was also the year that Engelbert Humperdinck's "Release Me" beat the best double-A side in pop history, "Strawberry Fields/Penny Lane", to No 1 in the hit parade, Vicky Leandros sang a much-hummed Eurovision entry, "L'amour est bleu", and Des O'Connor entered the Top 10 with "Careless Hands".

All such songs were ostensibly aimed at the respectable record-buyer, for whom seeing Frankie Vaughan in cabaret at the Talk of the Town was the acme of sophistication. They were also secretly listened to around the world by suburban would-be hipsters who could face no more of the boring passages from Sgt Pepper, or most of The Rolling Stones' one excursion into psychedelia, Their Satanic Majesties Request. The Seekers provided a real alternative for the teenager who could face no more George Harrison with a sitar or the future Sir Michael Jagger's determined efforts at decadence.

Buying a Seekers disc could involve a covert, perhaps after-dark, trip to the local electrical store, for admitting that you preferred to spend five shillings and ninepence on the songs of Miss Durham as opposed to those of Mick Jagger amounted to social death in terms of overall grooviness.

Today, The Seekers and their ilk rarely seem to appear on those occasions when British television relentlessly unearths that same Pathé newsreel of Carnaby Street to "celebrate" yet another 1960s anniversary. Instead, their music seems to belong to the provincial England on which the 1950s are rather reluctant to loosen their grip. In 1958, Tony Hancock recorded one of his finest radio half-hours, Sunday Afternoon at Home, a Pinteresque evocation of the miseries of suburban life where every form of entertainment is either closed or broken, and where the laws of time no longer apply. This is the same realm found in the photo archives of local newspapers – yellowing monochrome pictures of short-back-and-sided youths awkwardly lined up in their Civil Defence Corps uniforms; the sea of tweed coats that was the Winchester Young Farmers meetings of the late 1960s; and the local grammar school's celebration of its rousing success at the county chess tournament.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mpd_9l9w4RI

The local advertisements of the time portray a relentlessly grey world of sales of sensible slacks at the local tailors and barbers offering a short-back-and-sides for a mere 4s 6d. In the papers, you'll read about the local controversy about the possibility of automatic level-crossing barriers in the very near future, and the searing excitement of Michael Miles (of ITV's Take Your Pick fame) opening a new shoe-shop – also in the very near future.

In this England, respectable fathers would favour car-coats, listening to Mrs Dale's Diary and driving Morris Oxfords with starting-handle brackets and leather upholstery rather than sporting a kaftan at the wheel of a psychedelic Mini. Just as in a Ladybird book, red telephone boxes would still require the user to press button A and dial the operator for long-distance calls and, if the railway branch line had escaped the ravages of Beeching, the train arriving at the gas-lit station might still be steam-powered.

This, after all, was the year when David Frost and Simon Dee were still a middle-aged person's idea of what was young and hip. But 1967 was also the year Derek Cooper published his classic The Bad Food Guide, wherein he memorably skewered the frozen/deep fried/artificial cream/close at 5pm experience of typical British cuisine. The local "all night café" probably closed at 8.45pm. In 1967, a holiday abroad meant loading up the Hillman Superminx with Wonderloaf, lest the honest British tourist be forced to eat foreign food.

Of course, the wireless might provide exciting escape in the form of the all-new Radio 1, but even there, among the ex-pirate ship names, many of the DJs were reliably velvet-voiced middle-aged ex-actors such as Pete Murray. There was also the problem of the "needle-time agreement" with the Musicians' Union, which limited the airtime devoted to record playing as opposed to live studio broadcasts.

To supplement sessions by leading groups of the day, the station was heavily reliant on its in-house session band and, according to the late John Peel, one of V C Radio 1's early highlights was the Northern Dance Orchestra's version of "Hey Joe". At least the band's middle-aged vocalist did his very best to emulate Jimi Hendrix while wearing a cardigan in order to display his essential youthfulness.

As for British pop television, one of the very few 1967 moments from Top of the Pops that the BBC has thoughtlessly neglected to wipe – only four complete editions from the 1960s survive – boasts The Rolling Stones miming to "Let's Spend the Night Together". It is an iconic televisual moment, not least for those times when the camera pans to the audience to reveal cardiganed young blades clad in Hank Marvin glasses dancing with grim determination opposite eminently respectable mini-dressed young ladies. Fortunately, the BBC employed DJs with the demeanour of a particularly tolerant housemaster to explain away Jagger/Richards's more risqué lyrics.

The year 1967 also saw one the Stones' major controversies. Overshadowing their drugs bust was the infamous "Not Waving Bye-Bye Scandal" of 22 January. Sunday Night at the London Palladium was the jewel in ITV's light entertainment crown, so the Stones' decision to commit a foul act of sabotage – not waving goodbye to the audience in the closing credits – was guaranteed to shock prime-time viewers. It also rather helpfully detracted from the question of precisely what such an anti-Establishment group was actually doing there in the first place.

Such programmes were broadcast in black and white – in 1967, BBC2 was the first and only channel to provide very limited colour broadcasts, and ITV's colour shows were for export only. So, for many Britons, the alternative to this monochrome world was their local cinema. There, for a mere 1s 9d, the bill of fare might still include a newsreel and a B-film. The former would typically have a smooth-voiced announcer proclaiming the latest colonial disaster (it wouldn't be a proper 1960s newsreel without a British sporting victory and footage of at least one governor's residence in flames). The latter would be one of Merton Park Studios' Scales of Justice criminal shorts, as fronted by "the eminent criminologist Edgar Lustgarten".

The studio's 1967 offering, Payment in Kind, offers a fascinatingly bleak view of Wilson-era suburbia, with tallymen in their Vauxhall Victor Supers offering hire-purchase fantasies to bored housewives trapped behind their Tricity Deluxe cookers, combined with the traditional trilby-hatted Inspectors and police Wolseleys, black, with clanging bells. Then, following an Eastmancolor travelogue praising the beauties of Bournemouth as a holiday resort – "Dancing until 11 o'clock! This really is a swinging seaside town!" – there was, at long last, the main feature.

Here, one might at least expect to see some prime 1960s Technicolor clichés, such as the obligatory crane shot of five hipsters zooming over Tower Bridge in a Mini Moke, or general decadence and nudity along the lines of Antonioni's 1966 Blow-Up. But, of two of the best British films released that year, Bedazzled and The Deadly Affair, the former actually re-affirmed conventional morality (as well as demonstrating that Dud was a far better actor than Pete) and the latter was about a world of middle-aged despair.

Both were inevitably in complete contrast to the 1967 film that was to taint British cinema for quite a while after – Casino Royale. It may have boasted one of the most expensive casts ever, but it also used five studios, seven directors and countless scriptwriters to produce a film where the only abiding memories are of the Herb Alpert theme music and of poor David Niven's moustache visibly wilting in despair at the strain of carrying one of the most appalling films of this, or any, decade. It was a movie that had most British filmgoers eagerly awaiting the National Anthem that was played at the end of every cinema bill.

Fortunately, that year's Bond film, You Only Live Twice, was a safe option, with a hero who, as he previously informed us in Goldfinger, would not even contemplate listening to The Beatles without ear-muffs, and who philandered for Queen and Commonwealth. In the 1960s, Commander Bond spent precisely no on-screen time in Carnaby Street, and You Only Live Twice appropriately commences with Bond in the (then) colony of Hong Kong, where British military police in Sam Browne belts control the natives.

Almost as popular as 007 in box-office terms was Carry On Doctor, where the sole concessions to the new age were Barbara Windsor's miniskirt and Jim Dale combing his hair forward, and that immortal classic Calamity the Cow, an everyday Children's Film Foundation story of how cattle rustlers in deepest Surrey were defeated by a gang of Italia Conti students led by a notably well-spoken Phil Collins.

In fact, it was often British-set films that subverted or entirely ignored the (American funded) myth of universal hedonism that were the most interesting offerings of the decade; Michael Reeves's The Sorcerers used the horror-film genre to attack the impulses behind much of Britain's youth culture, and Nigel Kneale's screenplay for Quatermass and the Pit was inspired by the experiences of his wife as a young Jewish girl in 1930s Germany. The film's budget may seem pitiable, but the conclusion of the "ethnic cleansing" of London hasn't been equalled by films costing 20 times as much. Elsewhere, the Carnaby Street myth was applied by middle-aged film-makers with appalling results, none more so than in Corruption, with Anthony Booth doing his best to copy David Hemmings in Blow-Up with dialogue along the lines of "Freak out, baby!" Far out.

To reduce any era to ill-researched and increasingly banal images is to remove the fascinating ambiguities caused by the fact that periodisation can never be rigid. In 1967, the BBC was still screening The Black & White Minstrel Show. Homosexual acts were partly decriminalised. Forty years ago, Britain was fighting a bloody colonial battle in Aden, unmarried women might still be refused the Pill, and "orphans" would still depart from Tilbury to a new life in Australia. Glossy TV shows such as The Saint or The Avengers continue to peddle a 1960s myth precisely because they were shot on colour film as opposed to countless shows that were recorded on black-and-white video tape, only to be wiped a few years later.

This was a time when millions of viewers might enjoy Thora Hird and Freddie Frinton in Meet the Wife (name-checked by John Lennon on Sgt Pepper) or Hugh Lloyd and Terry Scott in Hugh and I, in addition to the self-conscious radicalism of Till Death Us Do Part. The surviving tapes of such shows, recorded in a cramped studio before live audiences, now appear as hilarious as an edition of Newsnight, but they were as much a staple of the Radio Times as The Billy Cotton Band Show.

Indeed, just as many viewers tuned into Jack Warner in Dixon of Dock Green as they did to see Simon Dee cruising through Manchester in his white Jaguar E-Type for Deetime. It was equally possible to view the ambiguities of The Prisoner and the mysteries of The Mike & Bernie Winters Show together with the enigma that was Hughie Greene in Double Your Money and the reassuringly respectable "Supt Lockhart of the Yard" of No Hiding Place – all on the same evening.

Just as there are Britons who refuse to admit that the nearest they came to the world of Miami Vice in the 1980s was seeing an L-reg Hillman Avenger doing a handbrake turn in Southampton, there are countless citizens in their sixties who should have the courage to admit that their favoured listening of 1967 was not so much "A Day in the Life" as The Seekers' "When Will the Good Apples Fall" or David Bowie's "The Laughing Gnome" – for do not all these songs hail from the decade that supposedly celebrated individuality? So, whenever anyone of late middle-age vintage trots out the cliché that "if you can remember the 1960s, you weren't there", bear in mind that the nearest they came to a freak-out was probably a caffeine overdose in a transport café on the A303.

London was in full swing, hemlines were rising and morals falling. More importantly, all manner of groundbreaking modifications were made to the people’s car – not least a whole host of technical changes that would take the Beetle into next decade… Here’s how that infamous year, and the milestone changes to the Bug, unfolded…

Ken Dodd’s Christmas show is the most watched programme on the box, The Beatles release Sergeant Pepper in a haze of drug fuelled genius, Che Guevara is shot and a man is given a new heart for the first time. The Dartford Tunnel is opened, plans for the creation of a new town called Milton Keynes are revealed and Spurs beat Chelsea 2-1 in the FA Cup Final.

The Summer of Love was a social phenomenon that occurred during the summer of 1967, when as many as 100,000 people converged in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. Although hippies also gathered in major cities across the U.S., Canada and Europe, San Francisco remained the epicenter of the social earthquake that would come to be known as the Hippie Revolution. Like its sister enclave of Greenwich Village, the city became even more of a melting pot of politics, music, drugs, creativity, and the total lack of sexual and social inhibition than it already was. As the hippie counterculture movement came farther and farther forward into public awareness, the activities centered therein became a defining moment of the 1960s, causing numerous 'ordinary citizens' to begin questioning everything and anything about them and their environment as a result.

This unprecedented gathering of young people is often considered to have been a social experiment, because of all the alternative lifestyles which became more common and accepted such as gender equality, communal living, and free love. Many of these types of social changes reverberated on into the early 1970s, and effects echo throughout modern society.

The hippies, sometimes called flower children, were an eclectic group. Many were suspicious of the government, rejected consumerist values, and generally opposed the Vietnam War. A few were interested in politics; others focused on art (music, painting, poetry in particular) or religious and meditative movements. All were eager to integrate new ideas and insights into daily life, both public and private.

Inspired by the Beats of the 1950s, who had flourished in the North Beach area of San Francisco, those who gathered in Haight-Ashbury in 1967 rejected the conformist values of Cold War America. These hippies rejected the material values of modern life; there was an emphasis on sharing and community. The Diggers established a Free Store, and a Free Clinic for medical treatment was started.

The prelude to the Summer of Love was the Human Be-In at Golden Gate Park on January 14, 1967, which was produced and organized by artist Michael Bowen as a "gathering of tribes".

James Rado and Gerome Ragni were in attendance and absorbed the whole experience; this became the basis for the musical Hair. Rado recalled, "There was so much excitement in the streets and the parks and the hippie areas, and we thought `If we could transmit this excitement to the stage it would be wonderful....' We hung out with them and went to their Be-Ins [and] let our hair grow. It was very important historically, and if we hadn't written it, there'd not be any examples. You could read about it and see film clips, but you'd never experience it. We thought, 'This is happening in the streets,' and we wanted to bring it to the stage.'"

Also at this event, Timothy Leary voiced his phrase, "turn on, tune in, drop out", that persisted throughout the Summer of Love.

The event was announced by the Haight-Ashbury's psychedelic newspaper, the San Francisco Oracle:

A new concept of celebrations beneath the human underground must emerge, become conscious, and be shared, so a revolution can be formed with a renaissance of compassion, awareness, and love, and the revelation of unity for all mankind.

The gathering of approximately 30,000 like-minded people made the Human Be-In the first event that confirmed there was a viable hippie scene.

The term "Summer of Love" originated with the formation of the Council for the Summer of Love in the spring of 1967 as response to the convergence of young people on the Haight-Ashbury district. The Council was composed of The Family Dog, The Straight Theatre, The Diggers, The San Francisco Oracle, and approximately twenty-five other people, who sought to alleviate some of the problems anticipated from the influx of people expected in the summer. The Council also supported the Free Clinic and organized housing, food, sanitation, music and arts, along with maintaining coordination with local churches and other social groups to fill in as needed, a practice that continues today.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvU0ghn-lQw

1967 Events

January – The London-set film Blowup is released in the UK. Director: Michelangelo Antonioni. Stars: David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles

1 January – England's World Cup winning manager Alf Ramsey received a knighthood and captain Bobby Moore received an OBE in the New Year Honours.

2 January – Veteran actor Charlie Chaplin opened his last film, A Countess From Hong Kong, in England.

7 January–1 July – The television series The Forsyte Saga was first shown, on BBC Two. The Forsyte family live a more than pleasant upper middle class life in Victorian and later Edwardian England.

15 January – The United Kingdom entered the first round of negotiations for EEC membership in Rome.

16 January – Italy announced support for the United Kingdom's EEC membership.

18 January – Jeremy Thorpe became leader of the Liberal Party. Thorpe took Liberals to brink of coalition government but resigned as party leader in 1976 after being accused of conspiracy to murder.

23 January – Milton Keynes, a village in north Bucks, was formally designated as a new town by the government, incorporating nearby towns and villages including Bletchley and Newport Pagnell. Intended to accommodate the overspill population from London – some 50 miles away – it would become Britain's largest new town, with the area's population multiplying during the 1970s and 1980s.

26 January – Parliament decided to nationalize 90% of the British steel industry.

27 January – The UK, Soviet Union, and USA sign the Outer Space Treaty.

6 February – Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin arrived in the UK for an eight-day visit. He met The Queen on 9 February.

7 February – The British National Front was founded by A. K. Chesterton (by merger of the British National Party and League of Empire Loyalists).

12 February – Police raided 'Redlands', the Sussex home of Rolling Stones musician Keith Richards, following a tip-off from the News of the World. No immediate arrests are made, but Richards, fellow band member Mick Jagger and art dealer Robert Fraser were later charged with possession of drugs.

Around 5:30pm on February 12th, 1967, around 20 police descended on Keith Richards‘ Sussex home, “Redlands”. Of The Rolling Stones, both Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were there at the time of the bust (Brian Jones was supposed to be there too but, according to Keith Richards, he and his girlfriend, Anita Pallenberg, were fighting when they left for Redlands, so they just left them behind in London) Several others had come down for the weekend including The Beatles‘ guitar player George Harrison and his then girlfriend, Patti Boyd, although they had left prior to the raid.

Brian Jones‘ trial took place in November 1967 also resulting in a prison sentence for the accused. However, after appealing the original prison sentence, Brian Jones was fined £1000, put on three years’ probation and ordered to seek professional help.

On this period, Keith Richards said, “There was a realization that the powers that be actually looked upon is as important enough to make a big statement and to wield the hammer. But they’d also made us more important than we ever bloody well were in the first place.”

25 February – Britain's second Polaris nuclear submarine, HMS Renown, was launched.

27 February – The Dutch government announced support for British EEC membership.

1 March – The Queen Elizabeth Hall was opened in London.

4 March - The first North Sea gas was pumped ashore at Easington, East Riding of Yorkshire.

Queens Park Rangers became the first Football League Third Division side to win the League Cup at Wembley Stadium defeating West Bromwich Albion 3-2. It was also the first year of a one-match final in the competition, the previous six finals having been two-legged affairs.

5 March - Polly Toynbee reveals the existence of the "Harry" letters that allege the secret funding of Amnesty International by the British government.

15 March – Manny Shinwell, 82, resigned as chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party.

18 March – The supertanker Torrey Canyon ran aground between Land's End and the Scilly Isles.

29 – 30 March – RAF planes bombed the Torrey Canyon and sank it.

9 July – Alan Ayckbourn's first major success, Relatively Speaking, had its West End opening at the Duke of York's Theatre with Richard Briers, Michael Hordern and Celia Johnson.

Hendrix on Fire

31 March – At the London Astoria, Jimi Hendrix set fire to his guitar on stage for the first time. He was taken to hospital suffering burns to his hands.

Not wishing to be outdone by The Who’s Pete Townshend who had performed first and smashed up his guitar, Hendrix opted to set his amp on fire so as not to be accused of copycat behaviour.

He requested some lighter fluid but couldn’t bring himself to destroy the Strat and so swapped it secretly for a less valuable instrument.

The Fender Stratocaster continued to be used on Hendrix’s American tour (his return to the States after moving to the UK in 1966 to make his fortune). It later fell into the hands of his record company managed by James Wright.

“When Jimi used to smash a guitar up you would try and rebuild it so he could use it again for that purpose. Pete Townshend smashed his guitar up and put the neck into the amp. Jimi was annoyed at this and asked for some lighter fuel. He just wanted to outdo Pete Townshend,” Wright told The Times.

“He played the black guitar for most of the act and then right at the end he swapped it for a repaired one that he set fire to. At the time the black Fender was his favourite guitar and he didn’t want to ruin it.

At the time of the stunt Hendrix was a big star in Britain but still relatively unknown in the States. A picture of him leaning over the burning instrument was used on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine and the incident went down in rock ‘n’ roll history – helping to turn him into a legend.

The guitar is in relatively good condition aside from a few chips and scratches.The CBS era instrument with contour style solid body and original candy apple case dates from late 1966/67 with rosewood neck and black solid body and white scratch protection.

It will be sold by the Fame Bureau on 27 November in Mayfair, London. It is 42 years since the man widely considered to be the greatest electric guitarist in history died in London aged 27. Another Fender Stratocaster that Hendrix set fire to in 1967 at the Finsbury Astoria was auctioned by the Fame Bureau in January £90,000.

2 April – A UN delegation arrived in Aden because of the approaching independence. They leave 7 April, accusing British authorities of lack of cooperation. The British said the delegation did not contact them.

8 April – Puppet on a String performed by Sandie Shaw (music and lyrics by Bill Martin and Phil Coulter) won the Eurovision Song Contest for the UK.

11 April – Tom Stoppard's play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead received its Old Vic premiere.

13 April – Conservatives won the Greater London Council elections.

2 May – Harold Wilson announced that the United Kingdom had decided to apply for EEC membership

5 May - The British-designed satellite Ariel 3, the first to be developed outside the Soviet Union or United States is launched.

The first motorway project of the year was completed when the elevated motorway section of the A57 road was officially opened (by Harold Wilson) to form a by-pass around the south of Manchester city area. The M1 was also being expanded this month from both termini, meaning that there would now be an unbroken motorway link between North London and South Yorkshire.

6 May – Manchester United won the Football League First Division title.

11 May – The United Kingdom and Ireland officially applied for European Economic Community membership.

14 May – The Roman Catholic Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King was consecrated.

20 May – In the first all-London FA Cup final, Tottenham Hotspur defeated Chelsea 2-1 at Wembley Stadium.

24 May – The Royal Navy Leander-class frigate HMS Andromeda was launched at Portsmouth Dockyard, the last ship to be built there.

25 May - Celtic F.C. became the first British and Northern European team to reach a European Cup final and also to win it, beating Inter Milan 2-1 in normal time with the winning goal being scored by Steve Chalmers in Lisbon, Portugal.

Shadow cabinet Tory MP Enoch Powell described Britain as the "sick man of Europe" in his latest verbal attack on the Labour government.

28 May – Sir Francis Chichester arrived in Plymouth after completing his single-handed sailing voyage around the world in his yacht, Gipsy Moth IV, in nine months and one day.

29 May - The first Spring Bank Holiday occurred on a fixed date of the last Monday in May, replacing the former Whitsun holiday in England and Wales.

'Barbeque 67', a music festival, at the Tulip Bulb Auction Hall, Spalding, featured Jimi Hendrix, Cream, Pink Floyd and Zoot Money.

1 June – The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, one of rock's most acclaimed albums.

4 June – Stockport Air Disaster: British Midland flight G-ALHG crashed in Hopes Carr, Stockport, killing 72 passengers and crew.

27 June – The first automatic cash machine (voucher-based) was installed in the office of Barclays Bank in Enfield.

29 June – Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones was jailed for a year for possession illegal drugs. His bandmate Mick Jagger was sentenced to three months for the same offence.

1 July – The first scheduled colour television broadcasts from six transmitters covering the main population centres in England began on BBC2 for certain programmes, the first being live coverage from the Wimbledon Championships. A full colour service (other than news programmes) began on BBC2 on 2 December.

4 July – Parliament decriminalised male homosexuality in England and Wales with the Sexual Offences Act.

7 July – In the last amateur Wimbledon tennis tournament, Australian John Newcombe beat German Wilhelm P. Bungert to win the Gentlemen's Singles championship. The next day, American Billie Jean King beat Briton Ann Haydon Jones to win the Ladies' Singles championship. The matches are also the first to be broadcast in colour.

13 July – English road racing cyclist Tom Simpson died of exhaustion on the slopes of Mont Ventoux during the 13th stage of the Tour de France.

18 July – The UK government announced the closing of its military bases in Malaysia and Singapore. Australia and the United States do not approve.

27 July – The Welsh Language Act allowed the use of Welsh in legal proceedings and official documents in Wales.

28 July – The British steel industry was nationalised.

July – Astronomers Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Antony Hewish became the first to observe a pulsar.

3 August – The inquiry into the Aberfan disaster blamed the National Coal Board for the collapse of a colliery spoil tip which claimed the lives of 164 people in South Wales in October last year.

5 August – Pink Floyd released their debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

8 August – Dunsop Valley entered the UK Weather Records with the Highest 90-min total rainfall at 117 mm. As of August 2010 this record remains.

9 August – Playwright Joe Orton was battered to death by his lover Kenneth Halliwell (who then committed suicide) in their north London home.

14 August – The Marine, &c., Broadcasting (Offences) Act 1967 declared participation in offshore pirate radio in the United Kingdom illegal. Wonderful Radio London broadcast from MV Galaxy off the Essex coast for the last time.

17 August – Jimmy Hill, manager of the Coventry City side who have been promoted to the Football League First Division for the first time in their history, announced that he is leaving management to concentrate on a television career.

28 August - The first Late Summer Holiday occurred on a fixed date of the last Monday in August, replacing the former August Bank Holiday on the first Monday in England and Wales.

Herbert Bowden was appointed chairman of the Independent Television Authority.

6 September – Myrina was launched from the slipway at Harland and Wolff in Belfast, the first supertanker and (at around 192000 DWT) largest ship built in the U.K. up to this date.

9 September – Former prime minister Clement Attlee, 84, was hospitalised with an illness reported as a "minor condition".

10 September – In a Gibraltar sovereignty referendum, only 44 out of 12,182 voters in the British Crown colony of Gibraltar supported union with Spain.

20 September – The RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (the QE2) was launched at Clydebank by Queen Elizabeth II, using the same pair of gold scissors used by her mother and grandmother to launch the Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary respectively.

21 September – The Conservatives captured Cambridge and Walthamstow from Labour in by-elections.

27 September – The RMS Queen Mary arrived in Southampton at the end of her last transatlantic crossing.

29 September – Cult television series The Prisoner was first broadcast in the UK on ITV.

30 September – BBC Radio completely restructured its national programming: the Light Programme was split between new national pop station Radio 1 (modelled on the successful pirate station Radio London) and Radio 2; the cultural Third Programme was rebranded as Radio 3; and the primarily-talk Home Service became Radio 4.

5 October – A Court in Brighton was the first in England and Wales to decide a case by majority verdict (10 to 2) of the jury.

10 October – Simon Gray's first stage play, Wise Child, opened at the Wyndham's Theatre, London, with Alec Guinness, Gordon Jackson, Simon Ward and Cleo Sylvestre.

11 October – Prime Minister Harold Wilson won a libel action against rock group The Move in the High Court after they depicted him in the nude in promotional material for their record Flowers in the Rain.

25 October – The Abortion Act, passed in Parliament, legalising abortion on a number of grounds (with effect from 1968).

30 October – British troops and Chinese demonstrators clashed on the border of China and Hong Kong during the Hong Kong Riots.

October – St Pancras railway station in London was made a Grade I listed building, regarded as a landmark in the appreciation of Victorian architecture.

2 November – Winnie Ewing won the Hamilton by-election, the first success for the Scottish National Party in an election for the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

5 November – A Sunday evening express train from Hastings to London derailed in the Hither Green rail crash, killing 49 people.

7 November – Boxer Henry Cooper became the first to win three Lonsdale Belts outright.

18 November – Movement of animals was banned in England and Wales due to a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak.

19 November – The pound was devalued from 1 GBP = 2.80 USD to 1 GBP = 2.40 USD. Prime minister Harold Wilson defended this decision, assuring voters that it will tackle the "root cause" of the nation's economic problems.

27 November – Charles de Gaulle vetoed British entry into the European Economic Community again.

28 November – Horse racing events were called off due to the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak.

30 November – British troops left Aden, which they had occupied since 1839, enabling formation of the new republic of Yemen.

1 December – Tony O'Connor became the first black headmaster of a British school, in Warley, near Birmingham, Worcestershire.

5 December – The Beatles opened the Apple Shop in London.

10 December – Ronald George Wreyford Norrish, George Porter and the German Manfred Eigen won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for their studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equlibrium by means of very short pulses of energy".

11 December – The Concorde supersonic aircraft was unveiled in Toulouse, France.

12 December – Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones, 25, won a High Court appeal against a nine-month prison sentence for possessing and using cannabis. He was instead fined £1,000 and put on probation for three years.

22 December – BBC Radio 4 panel game Just a Minute, chaired by Nicholas Parsons, was first transmitted. It would still be running more than forty years later.

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Browsing video podcasts on the Apple TV.

ABC World News, Comedy Central Stand-Up, National Geographic, and Rocketboom featured.

iPad fame at last 😉
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hehe made it onto the news - www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-18958786

Ha! Ha! Ha!
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From Nov. 12th broadcast of the Daily Show. This was in reference to Hannity substituting footage from Glenn Beck's Sept. 12th rally for the much smaller anti-health care rally of Nov. 5th. (Hannity apologized, but only, I believe, because he got caught. I truly think he thought he could get away with it.)

Suck it. Cue flame war in 3… 2… 1.